Beliefs

23 Reasons to Keep Putting Your Work Out Into the World

Today’s Tiny Talk is actually a spin on a newsletter I sent out several months ago called “23 Reasons to Keep Marketing Your Screenplay.” I had so many writers respond and tell me how much it inspired them.

I was thinking about it again recently and it just feels like there are people who really need to hear this right now, including myself!

It’s easy to start beating ourselves up this time of the year because we think we should be so much further along than we believe we are. 

That’s really just a bunch of baloney and even if it were true, it doesn’t serve you one bit. 

But putting your work out into the world is about so much more than just selling your screenplay, winning that contest, having someone hire you, or landing a manager. 

All the gifts and growth happen between where you are now and where you want to be. And where you end up is probably beyond any expectations or goals your mind could ever conjure up. You don’t want to leave all that gold behind and cave into cynicism by deciding that your work is not worth putting out there. 

Ultimately, your life will be so much richer, more joyful, and it will give you the best chance of actually reaching your goals – and even beyond to things you never imagined were possible for you – by simply choosing to believe that putting your work out into the world is a gift that just keeps on giving. 

So, here are 23 reasons and beliefs to keep you on the path of putting your work out into the world where it belongs. 

  1. When you reach out and share your work, doors start opening. And, not just for you, but the people you collaborate with, so it’s a win for all involved.
  2. Why spend your time thinking thoughts like “This won’t work”? You can just as easily reframe it to “This might work! If I don’t try, I’ll never know.”  
  3. “I can choose to believe that marketing my projects can feel simple and enjoyable.” 
  4. “I’ve done hard things in my life before. I can certainly stay the course and market my projects.”
  5. “I don’t have to do everything all at once or even today. Today, all I need to do is make a list of 10 people I’m going to contact to tell about my project.”
  6. Tiny, courageous actions, like meeting people, telling them you’re a screenwriter, or offering your projects and services, can lead to very big things.
  7. When you reach out and tell people about your projects and skills, they might hire you, they might know someone looking for a creator with your skillset, or you might know someone with the skills they’re looking for. There is no downside to putting your work out into the world and making new connections. 
  8. If they say, “I’d love to read your screenplay!” that’s great! If they say, “No, thanks,” that’s okay, too. Either way, you get to be proud of yourself for reaching out. 
  9. They might say, “Actually, I have a different project that might interest you….” Maybe it’s one that could change everything!
  10. Hearing “no” builds resilience and makes you stronger. Think about it – the worst that can happen from a “no” is a feeling, and we can handle our feelings by changing our thoughts.
  11. When you get a “no” answer, you still gain something valuable. For instance, you gain a contact, a friend, or maybe information you didn’t have before. That is amazing and it comes from just being vulnerable enough to share your work. 
  12. Every “no” means you’re that much closer to a “yes.”
  13. Sharing your work with the world takes practice, and you get better every time you do it. 
  14. Putting your work out into the world can be about something so much bigger than yourself. Put your work out there for those who have no voice – the incarcerated, the forgotten ones, and for those who have been ignored by the rest of the world. 
  15. If something hasn’t happened yet…it doesn’t mean it won’t.
  16. When you put yourself out there, there’s is a chance between 1% and 100% that you will get a yes. There is zero chance you will get a yes when you don’t put your work out into the world. 
  17. When you get good at being uncomfortable, you can become a master of not just your mind but of your craft. Both require pushing your boundaries.
  18. Marketing your projects is a small investment with the possibility of a high reward, and it takes very little time.
  19. When you put your work out into the world, doors open that you can see – and some you can’t see. It’s not our business to know when and exactly how. We just need to keep taking the next step from a place of belief that our efforts are worth every minute. 
  20. When you start taking action, you’ll be amazed at where it may lead you as well as to whom. 
  21. Imagine how boring your screenplay would be if you had a character who just sat around wishing for things! Go after what you want.
  22. Sharing your work with the world is simply believing and taking the tiny courageous action to say to others, “Hey, I’ve got a great idea, a promising project, something I’m really excited about. Can I tell you about it?”
  23. You can think of all the reasons it will never work. How does that serve you? Instead, you can choose to think of all the reasons it just might work. And that perspective will serve you for a lifetime. 

Get out there and market your projects!

Laree’

Are you stuck in a marketing rut or just have no clue how to start putting your work out into the world? I’m taking on 10-12 clients for my second One-on-One Marketing Mentorship workshop. You can check out all the details right here. Sign up before Oct.1 and get free coverage on your screenplay or pilot!

I couldn’t be more pleased with the outcome of the Marketing Mentorship program. With Laree’s guidance, I developed a polished portfolio of marketing materials and a solid marketing plan tailored specifically for my manuscript.  I enjoyed the individualized nature of the program and how Laree’ took into account my experience level, personal goals, and needs. It enabled me to approach the marketplace with confidence, target the right individuals resulting in multiple read requests and valuable connections. I highly recommend it!

~ Esther Shihabi

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